A Pencil Is a Many-Splendored Thing

Pencils have been around for hundreds of years, and still show no signs of fading away. Their most obvious usages for pencils are writing, erasing, and drawing, but there is so much more to this simple invention. For example, pencils could be used for: racing. I clearly remember having pencil races in grade school, seeing … Continue reading A Pencil Is a Many-Splendored Thing

It’s Nice to Know I’m Not the Only One Who Has to Cut the Cords

Who knew the Wall Street Journal would start sourcing some of its stories from The Onion? Nearly five years ago The Onion ran a photo story with the headline "Jumbled Nest Of Cords Makes Move To Third New Apartment". The story had no words, just the image shown above. Someone from the WSJ must have … Continue reading It’s Nice to Know I’m Not the Only One Who Has to Cut the Cords

Some First Impressions of Singapore

Warning: I enjoy reading travel essays where people share their travel experiences. The photos and the writing often make me feel like I am there. I just want to let you know up front, this post will fall far short of those wonderful travelogues. My wife, son, and I are fortunate to be spending the … Continue reading Some First Impressions of Singapore

Great Advice for 2020: The 20-20-20 Rule

Thanks to the latest Pinkcast for the idea for this post. In this edition of his Pinkcast, Dan Pink introduces a technique known as the 20-20-20 rule. The origin of the rule was created by a Californian optometrist as an easy way to remember an effective approach for reducing eye strain for those who spend … Continue reading Great Advice for 2020: The 20-20-20 Rule

A Clean Sweep for “They”

It was a big year for the word "They". The word was chosen by Merriam-Webster as the word of the year for 2019 and by the American Dialect Society as word of the decade. Ben Zimmer, chair of the American Dialect Society’s New Words Committee and language columnist for the Wall Street Journal, noted a growing … Continue reading A Clean Sweep for “They”

Music Monday: Comparing Top 500 Song Countdowns Across the U.S.A. (and the World)

It's been a tradition where I grew up, in the Philly suburbs, for a local radio station, WMGK, to play a list of the top 500 songs, as voted by listeners, over the Memorial Day weekend. This year the station replayed the list for the New Year, and I was surprised to hear that Stairway … Continue reading Music Monday: Comparing Top 500 Song Countdowns Across the U.S.A. (and the World)

I’ve Wrapped Up Today’s Blog Post as a Gift for My Readers

To read today's blog, just click on the package above; it's my gift to you, the reader.

So How Did These Predictions for 2020 Work Out?

Grace Hauck, a reporter for USA Today, put together an interesting story that looked at 20 predictions that were supposed to have taken place by 2020. I won't go over each one since you can read the full article for that. I thought I'd just take a look at a few of the more interesting … Continue reading So How Did These Predictions for 2020 Work Out?

Is Mindless Web Surfing the Key to Increasing Productivity?

If so, then why am I not one of the most productive people I know? A story in this week's WSJ tells about the work of Prof. Jennifer Ragsdale, a University of Tulsa industrial-organizational psychologist, and her research team who are studying whether surfing the internet for cute baby-animal pictures makes you more productive at … Continue reading Is Mindless Web Surfing the Key to Increasing Productivity?

Who Knew There Was a Law to Explain My Obsession with WordPress Stats

Sayre's Law states: "In any dispute, the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake." By way of corollary, it adds: "That is why academic politics are so bitter." Sayre's law is named after Wallace Stanley Sayre (1905–1972), U.S. political scientist and professor at Columbia University. The quote is often attributed to … Continue reading Who Knew There Was a Law to Explain My Obsession with WordPress Stats