Out of the Frying Pan and Into the Fire

An EasyJet flight taking off in France had to be diverted last week because of a fake bomb threat.

Flight EZY4319 from Lyon to Rennes was in the air when authorities received an anonymous call that suggested a bomb could be on the plane. The pilots returned to Lyon, but no bomb was found.

Investigators said the person behind the threat was a 23-year-old male college student in Rennes.

The reason – his parents were on the flight and he didn’t want them to visit him.

Over the years, I’ve heard a lot of reasons why people may call in fake bomb threats, but this was a new one.

I haven’t heard yet of the reason why the student did not want his parents to visit him, but it seems like there were much better ways he could have handled this.

When he found out that his parents were coming, he could have:

  • told them he was planning to study 24/7 for an upcoming test
  • told them he had the flu and couldn’t be around people
  • told them he had already made plans to be out of town during that time

I’m sure, given his apparent creativity, he could have come up with at least a dozen more excuses, and then chosen the best among them. There’s no way calling in a bomb threat would have been at the top of any list he came up with.

I’m also sure he didn’t think of the repercussions of his decision to call in a bomb threat (remember, it is a guy we’re talking about here). If he had done a simple cost-benefit analysis, here’s what it would look like:

potential benefit: parents don’t end up visiting, so I’m free to do whatever
potential cost: if convicted, I could face up to five years in prison and a fine of nearly $85,000 (according to the Independent).

Seems like a pretty straightforward decision to me.

So it’s a classic case of jumping out of the frying pan (the student is obviously associating some pain with having his parents visit) and into the fire (five years in jail, $85,000 fine).

I certainly hope that whatever the issues are between the young man and his parents gets resolved, because if he is convicted, I’m sure at that point he’ll want his parents to visit him while he’s in jail.

As an aside, it’s also nice to see that the U.S. doesn’t have a monopoly on such behavior…

*image from Pixabay

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