Proof Once Again That I’m Not a Trendsetter

I stopped drinking alcohol about eight years ago, basically for health reasons. I will admit I missed the taste of beer, so I would occasionally have a non-alcoholic beer, like O’Douls. (I should also point out that I eat fake hamburgers and drink decaf coffee – I know, what a crazy life I lead).

I stopped drinking just about the time the whole craft beer thing really started taking off, so I missed all of that.

But then last year, while we were in London for a few months, I decided to start drinking beer again. It seemed as if pubs were such a part of the social life in London, and I wanted to immerse myself in British culture. So having a beer and some fries became a regular part of our routine.

When we came back to the U.S., I took advantage of my new habit by visiting some of the local breweries, which seemed to be everywhere (and while they are fun to go to, and the beers are tasty, to me it’s hard to beat a Guinness or a Yuengling).

But wouldn’t you know it, just as I am getting back into having a cold one now and then, I came across the following headline on CNN.com: People are sick of drinking. Investors are betting on the ‘sober curious’

The reporter, Sara Ashley O’Brien, tells of her first visit to Getaway in Brooklyn:

Getaway is a sober bar, a new kind of dry nightlife option that is cropping up in New York City. The idea is to provide outlets for people who want to socialize in a bar-like location, but without having to drink alcohol. They are part of a larger trend. People are paying greater attention to their mental health and wellness, and many Americans are specifically looking to reduce their alcohol intake. People of all ages are drinking less beer, while millennials are drinking less overall. And Silicon Valley is taking note, with tech companies reevaluating their alcohol policies and investors looking to capitalize on people who prefer not to drink.

O’Brien notes that while sales of alcoholic beverages have been declining, big alcohol companies see an opportunity: They’re investing in non-, or low-alcohol drinks. So too, startup investors and entrepreneurs are hoping to cater to the “sober curious,” people who for the sake of wellness are reevaluating their relationships with alcohol and how often they drink.

All of this proves that I just march to the beat of a different drummer, a drummer who is not in sync with the latest trends.

I stop drinking, and there’s a craft beer explosion.

I start drinking, and there are startups focused on catering to the latest trend of people drinking less beer.

If this pattern continues, I’m guessing once I stop wearing my leisure suit, you’ll be seeing them on the runways at Paris.

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